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the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
of america. every time you come to this floor it's a question, why are we here? we are here to do the people's work. let's sit down. get it done. and move forward. instead of filling the agenda however worthy some of those initiatives may be, instead of not along with passing a middle income tax -- this is also reminiscent of a year ago. the president proposed, the house and senate, democrats and republicans, voted for the payroll tax holiday. the republicans in the house resisted. painted themselves into a corner until they had no choice. the issue had been made too hot for them to handle and they finally had to come around to supporting the payroll tax holiday. and here we are again. 100% of the american people will receive a tax cut when we pass the middle income tax cut. the wealthiest people in our country will receive a tax cut up to their income of $250,000. we are asking them to pay a little bit more for what they make over $250,000 a year. to help reduce the deficit, to help grow the economy, grow the economy. that growth is what is essential. you want to reduce the deficit, create
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put that in. i did not dwell on it. i think it is a footnote or something like that. but washington had
visit >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennesse
was afraid if they could not hold america, the dominoes will fall elsewhere in the british empire. he was wrong about that and he was wrong about a lot. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. but to blame it all on him would be a great mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and therefore the declaration of independence? >> that is all this stuff about george iii being an ogre and being responsible for everything. that was dressed up for very good reason. if you were urging a revolution, and by political theory of the era, you could overthrow a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant was ok, it was not a civil war. it was something that had greater justification. in order to make the case they needed heading into the period of wanting to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempe
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
-- abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves and settle them on land as sharecroppers in the '70s that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states but when he got back to the united states things change. >> you can watch this and other programs online at >> next on booktv, greg gutfield fox news's the five says liberals use manufactured our rage and artificial tolerance to deflect criticism of their political and social ideology. the author contends what he deems smart in tolerance should be used to counter liberal argument. it is about an hour. >> thank you. the first library i have been in where i haven't been asked to leave. i am not kidding, actually. i will get to that library joke in a minute. that was going to be my intro but during the signing nymex so many nice people when i was sitting there and are missing their going what would it be like if all of your fans were jerks? wouldn't that tell you something? if all of your fans -- i can't swear in the reagan library but if they were jerks, what if you were bi
of contemporary writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect a writer who has come for a visit and not treat that writer like some sort of circus side show. and to engage that person in conversation. we often like to say and joking among ourselves that we invite writers to dinner, and we just have these couple of public events on either side of the dinner or some gathering after one of those public events. what really happens is sitting down and having good conversation. it brings writers back. it's actually one of the things that people, i think, most appreciate about the writer's institute. writers will be respected as writers. i remember one writer saying, you know, you go to some literary readings, and you think, gosh, i'm so glad i got through that. let me, you know, catch the next plane out. you go to the writer's institute, and you find yourself saying, wow, that was good. i hope they invite me back. >> mom and dad were high school teachers, so we would take family vacations across
proprietary not in a bad way that in a quite paternal because they cared about the definition of america and the survival and success of america. they did that what drove jefferson this case is the fear that would be swallowed up as a free of the revolution virtually in the world had been by the forces of reaction. i argue in the book that it's impossible life and to understand early american history without seeing the period between the end of the french and indian war and 7063 and the end of the war in 1815 as a 50 year war with britain sometimes hot and sometimes cold but always there. in precise analogy but it would be writing about washington, adams, jefferson, hamilton without reference to this struggle. i think would be like riding but truman, eisenhower, kennedy, johnson, nixon, ford, carter, ronald reagan and not mentioning the soviet union. the foreign policy was that significant and his domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is that they did. so you win the argument. the war of 1812
not hold america, the dominoes will fall in the rest of the british empire. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. to blame it all on him would be a mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and then the declaration of independence? >> all that stuff about george iii being an ogre and responsible for everything, if your urging a revolution, by political theory, you could overthrow retired. -- a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant would be a good thing. in order to make the case they needed heading into wanting to be credible to the other nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he wasn't famous until he was famous in the sense that we know his
the targeted community depends heavily on. and we know america is aging. america is getting older every day. i think 10,000 people retire every day. by 2030 is as -- it is estimated 20% of the population will be aged 65 and over. this really targets services to an expanding population. next slide, please. the current funding formula for the older americans act, it is primarily based on age before title b and c and 7, the share of population age 60 and older, and for title 3e, the share of population which is 70 or older. the act also provide a minimal level of funding for each state. no state can receive less than half a percent in total appropriation. in 2012 these numbers were about 5.9 million and title seven, $108,000 respectively. the law also includes a provision, each state will receive a least as much as in the prior fiscal year. while the federal formula is based on age, the older americans act requires state programs to target prioritized services to that population with the greatest economic and social needs. these include factors like poverty, living at or below the poverty level,
-term investments here. at the same time, we do not start of what has been so much a part of america's -- do not starve so much of what has been a part of america's history, our willingness to invest in the future, and that includes children, poor children, modern infrastructure, basic and blue sky research. when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next few weeks, i think that is going to be a broader challenge we face over the next decade. >> i think we have time for one more question. over here. as the question is coming, i want to say how much we support the president in this fight on ensuring the balance, and the president has been very strong on that issue. >> richard singer. we are a biomedical company that helps nurses and doctors, may collaborate better with social media. we got a small amount of the innovation funding, but it is a broader question about the health care ecosystem. if the company goes under, all the software engineers get new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech, we have a lot of people with ph.d.s, longer-term and specialized types of areas, and we do
cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >>teve: this is probably going to bug you, people of afghanistan are supposed to be allies, right. >> brian: not according to their president karzai. listen. >> policies coming to us from terrorism and the taliban. it is partly coming to us from the structures that nato and traded in afghanistan. >> brian: our time and mon yesacrifices are a waste? >> steve: joining us is the army veteran for america. good morning to you. president karzai is blaming united states and nato for violence and corruption in afghanistan. he sounds a little >> yes, it is a nice posen pill to look at. i was in a
to change anything. they do not want to help america. what people are they for? the people have spoken, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agree
? this is big news. >>> playing politics with america's fiscal future. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. >> they would like to go beyond that or do it differently. >> but we're rising above it and putting your money first. guest host david walker of comeback america initiative and democratic strategist steve mcmahon both here to help us find solutions. >> then, what goldman's jim o'neill is so he seeing to help you prepare for your investments straight ahead. plus, adding opportunities door to door. >> have a good day. >> thank you. >>> domino's pizza ceo patrick doyle is here. the second hour of "squawk box" begins right now. >> good morning, everybody. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew is out this week. we've been watching futures this morning and they are indicated slightly higher. dow futures are up about 35 points above fair value, s&p futures and the fass dak futures are higher, as well. in your morning headlines today, the fiscal cliff dominating the sunday talk show circuit. treasury secretary tim geithner expressing on meet
in history and we all know it on so many different fronts, he changed the way america thinks. and it's quite a gift that he had, that he gave to the country. so for both of them, it has been just an enormous privilege for all of us to serve with you. and i think everyone on both sides of the aisle know there was greatness in our delegation and that it was an honor, john and barney, to have been able to serve with you. and thank you so much. and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. burton: madam speaker, let me just follow up on what was just said and say that barney frank and i had a lot of differences over the years, but we also found times we could work together and we co-sponsored a bill together one time. barney and your colleague, i wish you both the very best and hopefully we will run into each other. let me make a couple of comments to my two colleagues who are going to follow me on this special order who told me if i talked too long they will hit me in the head with a ball bat. i want to say a couple of things. daniel inouye, senator inouye, i never met, but i read in the paper m
that. republicans are holding hostage the middle class in america so that the wealthy don't have to pay their fair share. it is the republicans who are willing to let millions of americans rely upon an informant and insurance, to have that ended for them in just a few short days, people who have been out of work for over six months. republicans are holding them also. it is a manufactured crisis. what we are here to say is, first of all, i hope all of you agree with me, but no deal is better than a bad deal. no deal is better than a deal -- >> we'll take you back to the capitaol now. live coverage on c-span. >> yeah, right here. right here. right here, trust me, right here. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] if we get a deal, who will supply the champagne? >> republicans. they have all the money. >> are all watching somewhere. >> there's one. >> i am going to look for -- back.e rigtht >> senator mccain? can i talk to you out here for a second? [laughter] >> can we quote you on this? >> a man walks up to a podiu
from terrorism. part of the insecurity is coming to us from the structures that america created in afghanistan in the private security firms. the contractors that they promoted at the cost of afghan people. and the way they behaved with afghan people and the anger that has caused in the afghan people, and the resulting insecurity. >> would you say you believe that some of these would be intentional insecurity brought by nato in the united states? >> there is a very strong perception that some of that insecurity is intentional, yes. >> reporter: and when i asked him if he trusted the united states' motives in afghanistan he said, once bitten, twice shy. natalie? >> thanks so much, atia. >>> a new york city homeless man has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of a man pushed in front of a subway train. 30-year-old naeem davis is being held without bail. he served two years in prison for robbery. on wednesday, the victim's family spoke out. his daughter says she wishes someone had helped her father off the tracks but said, quote, what is done is done. >>> a candle l
had on yesterday's, author of "bloch: the rise of america's gun." i asked about senator feinstein's announcement that she will reintroduce the ban on assault weapons on the first of the senate. >> i will read the legislation very closely when it is out. i have to say i'm skeptical. the 1994 so-called assault weapons ban was one of the most porous, ineffective pieces of legislation that i personally have the opportunity to study. it was shot through with loopholes. it had no applicability to weapons that were made and sold on the day before enactment. and the fact it was coming for a period of years gave gun manufacturers an opportunity to run their factories overtime and to build up huge stockpiles of the weapons. so we will see. but if congress is not proposing to ban weapons that are already out there, then that leaves millions and millions of weapons already out there. >> that was paul barrett, author of "glock: the rise of america's gun." rebecca peters, if you could compare to the legislation that was passed in australia after the massacre, and also talked about the buyback a
've been hearing about these things. he broke into the woman's home and drove her to the bank of america branch where she worked. she triggered an alarm and the suspect escaped. it took them three hours to remove the device from her neck, she was not hurt. how scary is that. and a newspaper taking heat for publishing names and addresses of gun owners and they're not stop at that, the online maps, list of all people in westchester and rocklands county, in putnam county, the paper claims, but they say, uh-uh, privacy. and dozens of people try to find out and then find themselves in need of a rescue. >> somebody get a branch. >> oh, oh! so you could see one after another, they all start falling into the water. oh, within seconds of each other and chain reaction continuing as more people tried to help out. took ten minutes and luckily people on shore were able to pull everybody out and we can smile about it now because everybody was okay. >> because i was laughing. >> it's pretty comical watching na. look, you can see that ice is thin. don't go out on that. use your head, people. >> clayton:
. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogspot throughout the war in w
at the white house with just four days left until the deadline. >> they called him stormin norman. america remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacat
this morning." ñp that ended america's most infamous family feud. the hat fooelds and the mccoys. researchers have now found the first physical remains of the final battle. mark strassmann has the exclusive look of the evidence that could rewrite the history of these hillbilly clans. >> reporter: in these east kentucky hills bob scott's family has owned this land, almost 50 acres, since 1902. it was a stage for a bloody chapter in american history that's also part of his family history, the hatfield/mccoy feud. >> my mother's maiden name was hatfield. >> and this is mccoy property. >> randall mccoy, pate trat of the kentucky clan once lived here and his well sit here's on scott's land. his once enemy was hatfield, leader of the clan. this spot is where they finally ended a generation of fussin', fightin', and killing. sparked by a murder right after the civil war. >> mccoy's brother was a northern soldier. he comes back from the war. hatfield and his family fought for the south. word gout out they were out to get him and they eventually went out and get him. >> reporter: between 1865 and 1868
comes back to us is the substituted compliance, as strict in london as it is in america? it's unusual that the crisis happens in london. mr. cooper, would you like to comment on it? and i will say in basel iii we're hearing from some of our financial institution that is the capital requirements are more onerous on american banks because american regulate, are going to enforce them and many competitors feel they will not enforce it. so this is a problem if someone can go, to another, have a different standard in what is competitive global market in the case of capital requirement requirements. have a situation that is disadvantage to american firms. i'm concerned about the threat to american taxpayers. you can say you have substituted compliance but how are you enforcing the substituted compliance? you hear from some financial institutions, won't say it publicly but don't feel it is regulated in certain places and i'm wondering is london one of them. why are so many financial crises in london? i would like to here from mr. cook. >> i think that will be a very important situation if sub
production is increasing, this quarter ford projects it will build 725,000 vehicles here in north america. they are increasing it by another 25,000 next quarter. and one other thing, carl, when we talked about importance of trucks. in november, ford had its best month for the f series since november of 2005 selling 56,000 f series trucks. that's an 18% increase compared to last year. you are really seeing the momentum building in terms of production in truck sales. >> yeah. up a fifth on f series. thank you very much. significant number. >> i bought my f series last year. great car. great job. f-350. not diesel. >> where do you keep that? >> it's part of our inn complex. >> got it. >> i assume we think gm might be good? 20 minute >> i think so. >> let's go to rick santelli in chicago. >> if you want to find out what's going on in the states, bob pisani is very accurately discussed, you have to look toward europe. so let's look toward europe. let's look at 24-hour charts. let's look at a 24-hour chart of the euro currency. started to do much better. you throw up the bund. many areas whethe
? come on, let's do the right thing for america. that is what ought to be coming from the tragedies, not a president saying it is my way or the highway. his idea of compromise is get on board or you part of the problem. we have to have spending cuts. that is the bottom line. >>neil: thank you, congressman. >> four more americans are laid to rest, pastor rick warren on helping a nation to heal. , we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >>neil: in the wake of the connecticut shooting, growing cal
and get ambulances in. it's a mess. gregg: we are live from "america's newsroom" to elizabeth prann. elizabeth? >> reporter: hi, gregg. yeah, very unusual time of year for such destructive storms. in fact damaging tornados across the southeast. strong winds as far as texas. folks were celebrating their christmas evening as storms left00 of thousands of without power at any given time. the system moved through parts of alabama, georgia, mississippi and parts of florida. the biggest city to be hit by numerous rare winter twisters as well as powerful straight line winds. forecasters say there could have been as many as 19 tornados that ripped through the area. trees and power lines are on the ground, leaving debris in the roadway. folks in texas are feeling from where parts of the system originated. >> i tell you what. i never seen one in real life. just to hear one from that far away, that is a mile from where we are and you could still hear it. it was pretty amazing. >> as far as i know there is a small town, maybe 10 miles from here, lovelady. blew the roof off of a bank into anothe
can go back to sleep in america. i wanted to tuck people back in. >> is jack jacobs on the phone? let's take a pause. >> i put colonel jacobs back to sleep. >> no one can put colonel jacobs to sleep. he's hyperactive. as we indicated earlier in the show, a long-time friend, sometimes under ling of general norm an schwartzkopf. colonel jacobs, i was mentioning at the top of the show that the impact that general schwartzkopf, then colonel schwartzkopf had on me from an incident in vietnam that a woman in iowa, peg mullen, wrote about in a book called the "friendly fire" about the death of her son a young army private. general schwartzkopf was the army commander and he was so human and approachable to mrs. mullen. it was impressive. clearly he was an impressive guy. tell us your thoughts and memories of general sworts co h schwartzkopf. >> he was an impressive guy. i he met him when i whe was a mr and i was a lieutenant. i had an unpleasant experience with him during which i was trying to exercise my authority and responsibility. he is a higher ranking guy telling me, no, i he wasn't go
impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends here. good to see dan and rubber co and many others at the woodrow wilson center. there is no doubt the latino vote was important past election. we did not know how important this would be when we started t
predict america will go back into a recession. >> here's what will happen starting tomorrow. income taxes would increase $2,400 a year for families with an annual income of $50,000 to $75,000. their social security taxes would also go up on average $1,000 a year. and some 2 million jobless americans stand to lose their fed caleral unemployment benefits. in all, the congressional budget office says going over the cliff could cost the country more than 3 million jobs in 2013. we begin our coverage with nancy cordes on capitol hill. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the senate is set to reconvene in about an hour. we're told negotiations progressed well last night, that the vice president is now heavily involved and that the two sides have moved significantly towards one another on the top issue, which is tax cuts. but the big question is whether they can make it the rest of the way before tonight's deadline. senators filled the halls sunday hoping they'd have a deal to vote on, but just before 6:00, the senate leader sent them home. >> there's still significan
be the biggest concern for the united states of america, if it spreads across boundaries and al qaeda of the islamic maghreb will be a continuing problem throughout africa. thank you very much. >> senator isakson i'm always thankful for your partnership and the way our staffs work together for these hearings. forgive us, it is past left vending our appointed hour. all your testimony, your written testimony will be submitted for the record. there were several or the senators who expressed real interest in this hearing today but due to their sqed us were unable to join us. i will leave the record open for a week which will allow senators to address questions to any of our witnesses and take some actions going forward. i'm grateful for the support of efforts that made it possible for us to get a grateful discussion of many challenging issues facing the united states in the region and in mali. thanks for joining us. dr. dr. fomunyoh and miss dufka and thank you for your testimony today. we're grateful for your testimony and with that this hearing is adjourned. >> the labor department toda
these relations. >> on the book i talk about is this unique to america, that the public is fascinated with the scandal? i think there are reasons to be angry at bill clinton reasons to not be angry at bill clinton over the monica lewinsky thing but at one level you could say the economy was moving and we were at peace and things were happening and we are angry because the president received essential favors from a young woman. here's a newsflash. well, read the book. whereas in france, the joke is they wouldn't elect a leader who didn't have the stresses. i don't want a gelding in this race. so what we see is the marriages tend to have i guess a bit more as a prudish view toward sexual affairs than folks around the world and in the end of the book in the last chapter i offer some comparisons. this thing happens all around the world that we in the united states tend to be more infatuated because of our freedoms and because we don't have a royal family that we can be fascinated with. the president becomes a monarch and if resident. i don't know what it is, up that yeah frances had a num
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